Hibernica: or, Some antient places relating to Ireland ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Walter Harris
Printed for J. Milliken, 1770 - Ireland
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Page 129 - Ireland to absent himself for a time. '10. The said Undertakers shall not alien their portions during five years next after the date of their letters patents, but in this manner, viz., one-third part in feefarm, another third part for forty years or under, reserving to themselves the other third part without alienation, during; the said five years.
Page 23 - ... same parliament, and such causes, considerations, and acts, affirmed by the king and his council to be good and expedient for that land, and his licence thereupon, as well in affirmation of the said causes and acts, as to summon the said parliament, under his great seal of England had and obtained...
Page 136 - May, in the sixteenth year of our Reign, of England, France and Ireland; and of Scotland the one and fiftieth.
Page 23 - ... to be good and expedient for that land, and his licence thereupon, as well in affirmation of the said causes and acts, as to summon the said parliament, under his great seal of England had and obtained ; that done, a parliament to be had and holden after the form and effect afore rehearsed : and if any parliament be holden in that land hereafter, contrary to the form and provision aforesaid, it be deemed void and of none effect in law.
Page 168 - Pherecides was the first who Writ Prose in the Greek Tongue, and that he lived about the time of Cyrus, whereas Homer and Hesiod lived some Hundreds of Years before that Age, and Orpheus, Linus...
Page 170 - From this arises that elevation of genius, which can never be produced by any art or study, by pains or by industry, which cannot be^ taught by precepts or examples ; and therefore is agreed by all, to be the pure and free gift of Heaven or of nature, and to be a fire kindled out of some hidden spark of the very first conception.
Page 30 - I omit the distinction between a Christian and an infidel kingdom, which as to this purpose is wholly groundless, and most deservedly exploded — If a King comes to a kingdom by conquest, he may, at his pleasure, alter and change the laws of that kingdom ; but until he doth make an alteration of those laws the ancient laws of that kingdom remain...
Page 191 - A Declaration setting forth how, and by what means, the laws and statutes of England, from time to time, came to be of force in Ireland...
Page 30 - Christianitie, but against the law of God and nature, contained in the Decalogue. And in that case, until...
Page 5 - III. The Voyage of Sir Richard Edgecombe, sent by King Henry VII into Ireland in 1488 to take new Oaths of Allegiance from the Nobility and others, who had declared (for the then Pretender; Lambert Simnell. IV. A Breviate of the getting of Ireland, and the Decaie of the same, Written by Patrick Finglass. V. A Project of King James I.

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