Principles of Government: Or, Meditations in Exile (Google eBook)

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P. Donahoe, 1856 - Political science - 460 pages
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Page 104 - In all states and conditions the true remedy of force without authority is to oppose force to it. The use of force without authority always puts him that uses it into a state of war as the aggressor, and renders him liable to be treated accordingly.
Page 33 - ... stand upon such elevated ground as to be enabled to take a large view of the wide-spread and infinitely diversified combinations of men and affairs in a large society; to have leisure to read, to reflect, to converse; to be enabled to draw the court and attention of the wise and learned wherever they are to be found; — to be habituated in armies to command and to obey; to be taught to...
Page 33 - ... of men and affairs in a large society; to have leisure to read, to reflect, to converse; to be enabled to draw the court and attention of the wise and learned, wherever they are to be found; to be habituated in armies to command and to obey; to be taught to despise danger in the pursuit of honor and duty; to be formed to the greatest degree of vigilance, foresight and circumspection, in a state of things in which no fault is committed with impunity and the slightest mistakes draw on the most...
Page 33 - To be bred in a place of estimation ; to see nothing low and sordid from one's infancy ; to be taught to respect one's self; to be habituated to the censorial inspection of the public eye; to look early to public opinion ; to stand upon such elevated ground as to be enabled to take a large view of the wide-spread and infinitely diversified combinations of men and affairs in a large society...
Page 33 - ... rich traders, who from their success are presumed to have sharp and vigorous understandings, and to possess the virtues of diligence, order, constancy, and regularity, and to have cultivated an habitual regard to commutative justice: these are the circumstances of men that form what I should call a natural aristocracy, without which there is no nation.
Page 33 - ... of vigilance, foresight, and circumspection, in a state of things in which no fault is committed with impunity and the slightest mistakes draw on the most ruinous consequences; to be led to a guarded and regulated conduct, from a sense that you are considered as an instructor of your fellow-citizens in their highest concerns, and that you act as a reconciler between God and man; to be employed as an administrator of law and justice, and to be thereby amongst the first benefactors of mankind...
Page 33 - ... to be habituated to the censorial inspection of the public eye; to look early to public opinion; to stand upon such elevated ground as to be enabled to take a large view of the widespread and infinitely diversified combinations of men and affairs in a large society; to have leisure to read, to reflect, to converse...
Page 33 - A true natural aristocracy is not a separate interest in the state, or separable from it. It is an essential integrant part of any large body rightly constituted. It is formed out of a class of legitimate presumptions, which, taken as generalities, must be admitted for actual truths. To be bred in a place of estimation; to see nothing low and sordid from one's infancy; to be taught to respect one's self; to be habituated to the censorial inspection of the public eye ; to look early to public opinion...
Page 300 - ... years, in consequence of the fall of interest after the peace, to reduce the charge on account of the loan to 3 or 3 ^ per cent. ; but, owing to the way in which the contract was made, we have not had, and will not have, any means of reducing the exorbitant charge on account of this loan, so...
Page 153 - ... présentées, l'une par ces cours, l'autre par les conseils provinciaux. Les conseillers de la cour de cassation sont nommés par le roi sur deux listes doubles, présentées , l'une par le sénat, l'autre par la cour de cassation.

References from web pages

Introduction
William Smith O'Brien, Principles of Government or Meditations in Exile, Dublin, James Duffin, 1856, pp. 359, 287, 362. O'Brien, Principles of Government or ...
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